• What to Know Before Boating on a Lake

    0 comments / Posted by Robert Strong

    Taking the boat out on a lake is a great way to spend time with family and friends while enjoying nature and the water that surrounds you. Before you head out on the lake, there are a few things you should know and keep in mind at all times to keep yourself and your loved ones safe and happy.

    Fun Lake Boating Activities

    Before heading out on a boat, learn more about fun lake boating activities that you can enjoy. Some lakes may have public access spots where it is possible to rent paddle boards, jet skis, and even motorized boats. Research the lake you are planning to visit beforehand to discover which lake activities are right for you and your group. Always be sure to comply with rules and regulations in place when using a watercraft or operating boats. These can vary depending on your location, so make sure to educate yourself.

    Know Basic Boating Safety

    Understanding basic boating safety is imperative before heading out onto a lake, even if you consider yourself an experienced swimmer and boater. By following basic safety guidelines, you can avoid injuries related to boating. Always wear appropriate standard life jackets when abroad. Ensure that the life jackets used for both children and adults are the appropriate size to maximize protection. Some safety tips to keep in mind whenever you are on board a boat on a lake include using a first aid kit, having emergency lighting on hand and avoiding alcohol consumption. Keep your first aid kit well-stocked, and ensure it has bandages, antiseptic, and gauze in case of an injury. Stock solar lighting as well as flares when heading out on a boat on a lake. Finally, avoid consuming alcohol while on a boat to prevent overheating, disorientation or cognitive impairment.

    Remain Visible at All Times

    Remain visible at all times when you are a boat, even if you are boating during the day. During the daytime, it is possible to wear reflectors with polarized sunglasses. Be sure to check and verify that all of the lighting onboard your boat is in working order before leaving the dock. This will help to make sure that other boaters can see you and can help you if you get into trouble. It will also help you to see and for other people to see you in the event that it gets dark while you are boating. The last thing you want when you’re boating is to get lost or have another boat run into you if it’s dark when you’re on your way back to the dock.

    When you are properly prepared to take your boat out on the lake, you can do so with peace of mind without stress and anxiety. With the right preparation and the ability to remain aware of your surroundings, you can take advantage of your time in nature the next time you are out on your boat.

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  • A Guide to a Safe Out-of-State Hunting Trip

    0 comments / Posted by Robert Strong

    Heading out of state for a hunting trip to exciting, unfamiliar areas is a wonderful opportunity to explore new territory, and staying safe is the best way to ensure your next hunting expedition goes smoothly. Knowing the laws of unfamiliar regions helps you skillfully navigate your way through the wilderness. The following tips will increase your awareness about hunting out of state and protect you as you venture into unknown country.

    Inspect Your Car

    Before you hit the road, according to Class Auto Center, you should get your car inspected for any potential hazards, such as low tire pressure, oil or fluids that need to be flushed and changed to ensure it's in top condition. All those extra miles put a lot of wear and tear on your vehicle, so rotate and balance your tires to prevent serious undercarriage damage. Also, check the heating or cooling unit to confirm that it's operating properly.

    Be Alert

    Remember that many states have laws that ban texting and other cell phone use while driving. Therefore, if you must use your cell phone, pull over. Don't drink and drive. According to Schnipper Law, a DUI conviction out of state will be reported back to your home state, where your license may be suspended. If you get tired while driving, switch drivers if you're traveling with a friend. Otherwise, pull into a safe area and rest until you're ready to safely continue. While you're on the hunt, blending into the backdrop of the woods may help you camouflage yourself, but it also makes you nearly invisible to other hunters. Hunter safety is serious, and protecting yourself with properly colored gear prevents accidents from happening.

    Know the Gun Laws

    When you're traveling to another state to hunt, you should research that state's gun laws, according to The Daily Dot. Obeying the laws of the state you're in ensures that you'll encounter fewer potential issues if a park ranger or other official is present while you're hunting. Take care when storing your guns, and remember to treat every firearm as if it were loaded. Certain guns may also be illegal to carry in certain states. Make sure to find out which type of firearms you're allowed to legally carry.

     

    Hunters need to follow strict guidelines and safety practices for a fun and successful experience. Getting to your out-of-state destination safely and adhering to gun laws reduces your chances of the unexpected happening. Storing and using your weapons with care and being alert lets you confidently enjoy your outdoor excursion.



    Check out our great selection of hunting supplies to bring on your next trip!

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  • Safety on the Slopes: How Ski Helmets Reduce the Risk of Head Injuries

    0 comments / Posted by Robert Strong

    You probably would never consider riding a motorcycle or a bicycle without a helmet, but you may still be skiing without protective gear for your head. Over the past decade, the use of skiing helmets has risen dramatically. About 83 percent of skiers in the United States wear helmets—a sharp contrast from just seventeen years ago when the average amount of skiers wearing helmets was about 25 percent. The day is approaching when wearing a ski helmet will be as embraced as buckling your seatbelt when you get into a car.

    Protecting Against Head Injuries

    Researchers have conducted tests to determine which ski helmets provide the best head protection. The tests measured shock absorption and oblique impacts. Computer simulations then evaluated injury risk. Of course, any helmet you choose should be designed for and successful at preventing concussions. Many helmets are effective in reducing head injuries such as skull fractures and concussions. Doing your research before buying a helmet will help you determine which one best suits your skiing style and offers you the best protection from injuries.

    The Right Fit

    An ill-fitting ski or snowboard helmet is dangerous and defeats its intended purpose. Before you hit the slopes, put aside the desire to be stylish and make sure your headgear is the right size for you. The helmet should fit snugly but not be too tight. Put the helmet on and move your head from side to side. The helmet should not shift on your head. If it does, try a smaller size. Also, make sure there is no gap between the edge of the helmet and the top of your goggles. Additionally, the helmet should not be pushing down on your goggles or impairing your vision.

    Be Smart

    Proper head protection is just one aspect of skiing and boarding safety. Be that prudent skier who is always in control. Do not ski above your physical ability. Obey the rules of the resort or mountain where you are skiing. The rules are mainly developed to protect you and other skiers. In addition to a well-fitting helmet, make sure all your gear is appropriate for you and that you are comfortable using it.

    Enjoy your time on the slopes and be sure to take care of your safety. Make sure you wear a properly designed and fitting helmet to protect your head. Obey the safety rules of your ski location and ski defensively to protect yourself and other skiers and boarders.



    For the perfect outfit while you’re skiing, check out our skiing camping ski pants!

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  • Safety on the Slopes: How Ski Helmets Reduce the Risk of Head Injuries

    0 comments / Posted by Robert Strong

    You probably would never consider riding a motorcycle or a bicycle without a helmet, but you may still be skiing without protective gear for your head. Over the past decade, the use of skiing helmets has risen dramatically. About 83 percent of skiers in the United States wear helmets—a sharp contrast from just seventeen years ago when the average amount of skiers wearing helmets was about 25 percent. The day is approaching when wearing a ski helmet will be as embraced as buckling your seatbelt when you get into a car.

    Protecting Against Head Injuries

    Researchers have conducted tests to determine which ski helmets provide the best head protection. The tests measured shock absorption and oblique impacts. Computer simulations then evaluated injury risk. Of course, any helmet you choose should be designed for and successful at preventing concussions. Many helmets are effective in reducing head injuries such as skull fractures and concussions. Doing your research before buying a helmet will help you determine which one best suits your skiing style and offers you the best protection from injuries.

    The Right Fit

    An ill-fitting ski or snowboard helmet is dangerous and defeats its intended purpose. Before you hit the slopes, put aside the desire to be stylish and make sure your headgear is the right size for you. The helmet should fit snugly but not be too tight. Put the helmet on and move your head from side to side. The helmet should not shift on your head. If it does, try a smaller size. Also, make sure there is no gap between the edge of the helmet and the top of your goggles. Additionally, the helmet should not be pushing down on your goggles or impairing your vision.

    Be Smart

    Proper head protection is just one aspect of skiing and boarding safety. Be that prudent skier who is always in control. Do not ski above your physical ability. Obey the rules of the resort or mountain where you are skiing. The rules are mainly developed to protect you and other skiers. In addition to a well-fitting helmet, make sure all your gear is appropriate for you and that you are comfortable using it.

    Enjoy your time on the slopes and be sure to take care of your safety. Make sure you wear a properly designed and fitting helmet to protect your head. Obey the safety rules of your ski location and ski defensively to protect yourself and other skiers and boarders.



    For the perfect outfit while you’re skiing, check out our skiing camping ski pants!

    Read more

  • 3 Plants That You Need to Watch Out for During Hikes

    0 comments / Posted by TravDevil Contributor

    Hiking is a popular activity for those who enjoy spending time in the great outdoors and exercising. Although it can be fun to explore new settings in nature, there are a few plants that can be dangerous to encounter. Here are a few of the plants that you should steer clear of while hiking, as well as how to identify them and treat a reaction if you come into contact with them.

    Poison Oak

    According to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, poison oak causes a skin rash, which can become red and itchy if you come in contact with the plant. After a few hours, fluid-filled bumps can form on the skin. Many people also develop hives. Those who have a severe reaction to poison oak will need to visit a walk-in clinic to obtain corticosteroid pills for relief. In most cases, the symptoms will resolve with cold compresses, antihistamines, and calamine lotion.

    You can identify poison oak by its leaves. The leaves resemble oak leaves as an upright shrub that can grow up to three feet tall. The leaves also have "hair" on both sides.

    Poison Ivy

    Those who encounter poison ivy often have a skin reaction, which can appear immediately or up to five days later. About 85% of the population is allergic to it. When the leaves of the plant are brushed or bumped, urushiol is released, which can transfer from one person to another. The urushiol often leads to a rash, which can be accompanied by a fever. MD Proactive advises taking some over-the-counter medication such as Benadryl for relief. Unfortunately, poison ivy is commonly found in suburban or rural areas and easily blends in with other plants. Contact with the plant can be avoided by wearing long sleeves and pants while hiking.

    Oleander

    Oleander may be beautiful, but it is poisonous to both animals and humans. Solv says that it can lead to severe symptoms that include vomiting, stomach pain, fatigue, dizziness, and diarrhea. For those who have accidentally consumed the plant, it's important to visit a local hospital to ensure that the stomach can be pumped. Charcoal can also be ingested to absorb the poison from the plant.

    Researching the different types of plants that can pose a threat out in the wild is necessary to protect yourself. Understanding how these common plants can affect you and the proper treatment methods that are available will allow you to continue enjoying hiking and remain safe.

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